Remote guarding has changed drastically in the last decade. It’s not as simple as just having someone monitoring your surveillance system.

Thanks to advances in technology, remote guards are even more effective than they once were. This allows businesses to save money, yet stay more secure.

By incorporating these remote guarding advances into your security plan, your employees and customers will feel safer.

Using Drones

Use drones to complement traditional security cameras. Instead of being relegated to small areas at a time, drones are able to easily move all around the perimeter and above your business. They’re ideal for escorting employees to vehicles or ensuring vandals aren’t able to find a blindspot in your surveillance.

Drones can be used at specific times or constantly patrol. The good thing is the video quality is now just as good as standard security cameras.

Bi-Directional Audio

Audio used to be tricky with remote guarding. It began with speakers that allowed the guard to speak. However, the guard couldn’t hear anyone on the other end. The next step was speakers that required a person to push a button to communicate with the guard.

Now, bi-directional audio is built-in to the cameras. There isn’t a need for additional speakers. Of course, businesses can switch the audio on or off so guards don’t hear confidential information during meetings.

However, having bi-directional audio is ideal for emergency situations. Guards are able to quickly communicate with employees and customers. For instance, in the event of a fire, if cameras are still working, a guard can guide people around the fire and help them escape safely.

Advanced Video Analytics

Some surveillance systems are now being built with advanced video analytics that allows the cameras to recognize certain types of activity. For instance, the camera would know the difference between an animal walking through the parking lot and a human.

By having a more intelligent camera, guards are able to watch more monitors at a time. Think of it as the camera serving as an additional guard. While the camera can’t take action on its own, it can alert the remote guard if it sees anything suspicious.

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence is becoming far more advanced and it’s helping with remote guarding. AI technology can learn patterns about your business. For instance, after a few weeks of monitoring, the AI system learns the average number of cars that come and go, what hours your business is open, when people should be there and more.

Based upon what the AI learns, the cameras send out alerts to let the guard know if anything is different from the norm. The good thing is the AI continues to learn. For instance, if your business changes it hours, the guard can input these changes, allowing the AI to account for any new differences.

Custom Alerts

Remote guarding isn’t easy. It requires a guard to constantly observe multiple screens and camera angles at a time. There’s no possible way to see everything at once.

Sadly, all it takes is the blink of an eye for an intruder to enter the building or hide behind a parked car at the edge of the parking lot.

Thanks to custom alerts, a remote guard doesn’t have to keep their eyes open 24/7. These alerts serve as a second pair of eyes to recognize suspicious activity. For instance, a guard might get an alert the moment any human walks into the parking lot. Even if the guard can’t see them, they’ll be able to check the footage and find out where the person is hiding.

Alerts can be completely customized to your business needs. For instance, if only 20 people per day are supposed to enter your office, an alert can be sounded if more than 20 humans walk in the door during a set period of time.

Contact BOS Security

Want to know more about the advanced technology behind remote guarding? Contact our team at 404-793-6965 with any questions you might have.

Do you know what security vulnerabilities your business has? Create better security plans by starting with our free Security Needs Assessment.

Image: Stephen Cook