The greatest threat to our national security right now is not ISIS or a resurgence of Communism in Eastern Europe, and it’s not even Ebola – it’s fear. The virulence of this terrible virus is hitting home with six cases currently being treated in the United States. The CDC insists that hospitals and airports are following the most stringent security protocols, while a doctor travelling from Guatemala recently flaunted the fact that he was not questioned or quarantined while travelling in a Hazmat suit. Recent headlines about the Ebola outbreak on US soil point toward a break-down in security protocol.

But what is really happening? As we gear up for cold and flu season, more and more people are reacting out of fear. Every point of entry for travellers arriving from international flights is being closely monitored. But hospitals and clinics of every size and capacity are more afraid of unwarranted panic than Ebola. Calls from doctors in the Dallas area have increased ten-fold since the CDC announced the first Ebola case diagnosed on US soil September 30, but all of them have been false alarms.

How can your security system know the difference between a false alarm and a real threat? This is where the very sophisticated guard tour patrol system becomes an invaluable tool. Your private security force is given the most comprehensive and up-to-date information on the reality of the threat of Ebola, and are prepared as any health-care worker to respond immediately and effectively.

Handheld scanners with simple apps allow security officers to communicate with each other on patrol as well as with the central command center. Up to date information is crucial to identify potential threats, and to offer real-time feedback to determine as quickly as possible how to respond to any threat – real or percieved. Additionally, a comprehensive guard tour patrol system can include sophisticated GPS scanners and PDA’s.

Contact us for the latest news in security systems and solutions.

 

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